Green!


I heard the weatherman say March first begins “meteorological spring” here in Texas. I wasn’t sure all that implied but, after living here seven years, I am inclined to agree: the last of February always greens up like early spring.

When it rains (which is a big deal) the earth turns loose of its pungent mold waiting to escape and scent the air with nature’s patchouli. Green is just a few hours away!

Alfalfa in mountains

Alfalfa fields speak life to me

In late February this year we drove south to Austin and the alfalfa fields were gloriously green. The hedges were blooming, even roses. I’ve been to Galveston in mid-winter, so I am confident they have green palm trees and their oleanders are blooming all winter.

I love flowers, even the tiny little things that bloom in the grass: dandelions, Venus’ looking glass, grape hyacinths, violets, dianthus, sedum, gill-over-the-ground, blue-eyed grass and chickweed. They all signal spring is near.

In winter, when the world is mostly gray and white and brown, even olive looks cheery. But the pines and cedars and cypress put on new, bright shades when warm spring rains invigorate them.

The thing that lightens my heart the most is green grass. There is something revitalizing about the color green. Nothing looks lusher than bright emerald fields. Even the wild buffalo grass brightens my mood when its color perks up from winter’s yellowing.

I wonder if children and animals feel livelier when they see green or if it is a psychological effect that is learned?

To me, green sends a message of new life, energy, fertility and at the same time, soothing calmness, relief and success.

God named the first month of the year Abib, which is Hebrew for “green shoot” or “green ears of grain.” That’s a little like the English word “spring” as in “spring forth.” If I had been consulted, I think I would have called it “Green”!

 

Read more on the psychology of green (and other colors) here: https://www.verywell.com/color-psychology-green-2795817

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About janets123

Children's writer, newspaper columnist, essayist, poet, storyteller
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